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Saturday, May 25 2019 since 1997 Summer Semester 2019

Archive

Conversions

Since the experience of Paulus on the road to Damascus, the profound inspiration that  ›things cannot go on this way‹, has been told as individual and spiritual affair, as an evi-dential experience, but also as a narrative of cultural and political change, a transcenden-tal evocation of breakup and outbreak. Radical transition, individual or collective, consti-tutes the symbolical practice and rhetorical strategies of religious, philosophical, political and literary conversion narratives. Since the bitter fate of the conversos, the Jews at the time of the Spanish Reconquista, historical tradition has forced conversions as warning signs of violence and genocide, in modernity the racially, politically und religiously motivated expulsion and annihilation of minorities. How can possibly the radical appeal of confession and conversion be experienced, less dramatic and heroic, when practical everything is ›convertible‹, records of data and information, currencies, languages and identities? In retrospect, referring to the zone of transition, the »becoming otherwise«, the classical examples of a ›blitzconversion‹ might also reveal as a long term, manifold process of transformation, remembering e.g. the implementation of religious symbols, emblems and rites in secular forms. In the autobiographical narrations of conversion we will definitely find traces of the original culture in the text of the newly acquired living. In the program of the Mosse-Lectures the narratives of conversion from Maimonides to Heinrich Heine will be negotiated, as well as the concepts of conversion in the historical writings of religion, political philosophy, literature and anthropology.

Program

Sarah Stroumsa (Hebrew University, Jerusalem) »Passages: Between Acculturation and Conversion in Islamic Spain« Wednesday, May 06, 2015, 07:15 pm, Unter den Linden 6, Senatssaal

The High Middle Ages in Islamic Spain (al-Andalus) is often described as golden age in which Jews, Christians and Muslims lived in harmony. The attested dynamics of conversions to Islam disturb this idyllic, static picture, revealing the religious and social pressures exerted on the religious minorities. The different reactions of the Jewish and Christian communities of al-Andalus to these pressures allow us to refine our understanding of conversion in the Medieval Islamic world. Between cultural assimilation and religious coercion, the choices available to members of the minorities covered a broad spectrum, allowing for more nuances and ambivalence than »conversion« normally suggests.

Sarah Stroumsa is the Alice and Jack Ormut Professor Emerita of Arabic Studies. She taught in the Department of Arabic Language and Literature and the Department of Jewish Thought at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, where she served as the Rector of the University from 2008 until 2012. Her area of academic focus includes the history of philosophical and theological thought in Arabic in the early Islamic Middle Ages, Medieval Judaeo-Arabic literature, and intellectual history of Muslims and Jews in Islamic Spain. Among her published works in English: Freethinkers of Medieval Islam: Ibn al-Rawandi, Abu Bakr al-Razi, and Their Impact on Islamic Thought (Leiden: Brill, 1999); and Maimonides in his World: Portrait of a Mediterranean Thinker (Princeton University, 2010; Paperback edition 2012).

 

Fotos

  • Klaus Scherpe begrüßt die Gäste der ersten Mosse-Lecture zum Thema "Konversionen"     © Niels Leiser
  • Christoph Markschies stellt Sarah Stroumsa vor     © Niels Leiser
  • Sarah Stroumsa hält ihre Mosse-⁠Lecture     © Niels Leiser
  • Sarah Stroumsa vor ihrem Publikum     © Niels Leiser
  • Sarah Stroumsa     © Niels Leiser
  • Christoph Markschies     © Niels Leiser
  • Christoph Marschies antwortet auf Sarah Stroumsas Vortrag     © Niels Leiser
  • Sarah Stroumsa und Christoph Markschies diskutieren     © Niels Leiser
  • Fragen aus dem Publikum     © Niels Leiser
  • Mosse-⁠Lecture mit Sarah Stroumsa und Christoph Markschies     © Niels Leiser
  • Sarah Stroumsa und Christoph Markschies vor den Humboldt-⁠Brüdern     © Niels Leiser

Stephen Greenblatt (Harvard University) »Augustine in the Garden« Monday, May 18, 2015, 07:15 pm, Unter den Linden 6, Senatssal

I will be concerned with two narratives of conversion. The first is the celebrated conversion of Augustine, which occurred in the year 386 and led to his redemption; and the second is the conversion of Adam and Eve, which occurred in year one and led to their death and to the death of all mankind. The two are, of course, linked: without the conversion of our first parents from innocence to guilt there would have been no occasion for the conversion of Augustine from sin to salvation. I will explore these links, as Augustine broods about them in his long, unfinished »Literal Interpretation of the Book of Genesis«.

Stephen Greenblatt is Professor of Humanities in the Department of English, Harvard University; he is a member of several academies in the US and a Permanent Fellow at the Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin; National Book Award (2011), Pulitzer Prize 2012 for The Swerve. How the World Became Modern (2011). Recent publications e.g.: Hamlet in Purgatory (2002), Will in the World. How Shakespeare became Shakespeare (2005), Cultural Mobility (2010), Shaekespeare’s Freedom (2010).

Read an article about the lecture by Stephen Greenblatt here:

http://www.tagesspiegel.de/kultur/mosse-lecture-mit-stephen-greenblatt-erektion-im-badehaus/11799006.html

Fotos

  • Joseph Vogl bei der Einführung     © Niels Leiser
  • Stephen Greenblatt bei seinen Ausführungen zu George L. Mosse     © Niels Leiser
  • Stephen Greenblatt über Augustinus     © Niels Leiser
  • Stephen Greenblatt     © Niels Leiser
  • Stephen Greenblatt bei seiner Mosse-Lecture zu „Augustine in the Garden"     © Niels Leiser
  • Stephen Greenblatt und Joseph Vogl bei der Diskussion     © Niels Leiser
  • Stephen Greenblatt und Joseph Vogl im Gespräch mit dem Publikum     © Niels Leiser
  • Diskussion: Stephen Greenblatt und Joseph Vogl     © Niels Leiser
  • Stephen Greenblatt und Joseph Vogl     © Niels Leiser

Stefan Weidner und Christoph Peters (Beirut und Berlin) »Hin und weg. Wie und warum bekehren sich Europäer zum Islam« Thursday, May 28, 2015, 07:15 pm, Unter den Linden 6, Senatssaal

Fotos

  • Elisabeth Wagner bei der Einführung     © Niels Leiser
  • Stefan Weidner      © Niels Leiser
  • Stefan Weidnerbei seinen Ausführungen zu Mohammed Asad     © Niels Leiser
  • der Schriftsteller Christoph Peters     © Niels Leiser
  • Christoph Peters bei seinen Ausführungen zum Islam     © Niels Leiser
  • Christoph Peters     © Niels Leiser
  • Lothar Müller stellt Fragen an St. Weidner u. Christoph Peters     © Niels Leiser
  • Lutz Winkler bei der Diskussion     © Niels Leiser
  • Ulrike Vedder befragt St. Weidner u. Christoph Peters     © Niels Leiser
  • Diskussionsteilnehmer bei der Mosse-Lecture mit Stefan Weidner und Christoph Peters     © Niels Leiser
  • Stefan Weidner und Christoph Peter bei der Diskussion mit dem Publikum     © Niels Leiser
  • Christoph Peters und Stefan Weidner vor den Humboldt-Brüdern     © Niels Leiser

Klaus Briegleb (Hamburg) »›Ihr Toren, die ihr im Koffer sucht!‹ Zu Heinrich Heines Marranentum« Thursday, June 18, 2015, 07:15 pm, Hörsaal 1.101, Dorotheenstr. 24 (Zugang: Hegelplatz), 1. Stock

Fotos

  • Ulrike Vedder stellt dem Publikum Klaus Briegleb vor     © Niels Leiser
  • Klaus Briegleb bei seinen Ausführungen zu Heinrich Heines Marranentum     © Niels Leiser
  • Klaus Briegleb bei seiner Mosse-Lecture     © Niels Leiser
  • Klaus Briegleb über Heine/mit Heine     © Niels Leiser
  • Diskussion: Klaus Briegleb und Ulrike Vedder     © Niels Leiser
  • Diskussion mit dem Publikum     © Niels Leiser
  • Fragen aus dem Publikum     © Niels Leiser
  • Mosse-Lecture mit Klaus Briegleb     © Niels Leiser
  • Florian Scherübl bei seinem Diskussionsbeitrag. Rechts: Johanna Hähner     © Niels Leiser
  • Klaus Briegleb und Ulrike Vedder     © Niels Leiser

Hans Joas (Humboldt Universität, University of Chicago) »Ein Christ durch Krieg und Revolution. Alfred Döblins Erzählwerk November 1918« Thursday, June 25, 2015, 07:15 pm, Unter den Linden 6, Senatssaal

Fotos

  • Lothar Müller begrüßt die Gäste der 156. Mosse-Lecture an der Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin     © Niels Leiser
  • Hans Joas bei seiner Mosse-Lecture     © Niels Leiser
  • Hans Joas     © Niels Leiser
  • Hans Joas vor seinen Zuhörern     © Niels Leiser
  • Lothar Müller und Hans Joas bei der Diskussion     © Niels Leiser
  • Hans Joas argumentiert     © Niels Leiser
  • Diskussion mit dem Publikum, rechts: Klaus Scherpe     © Niels Leiser
  • Diskssuionsteilnehmer Erik Porath     © Niels Leiser
  • Eine Diskussionsteilnehmerin befragt Hans Joas     © Niels Leiser
  • Hans Joas und Reinhard Jirgl     © Niels Leiser
  • Hans Joas vor den Humboldt-Brüdern     © Niels Leiser
  • Lothar Müller und Hans Joas vor den Humboldt-Brüdern     © Niels Leiser